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BandaLarga

as autoestradas da informação

BandaLarga

as autoestradas da informação

Na Suécia, o sucesso do cheque ensino

Na socialista Suécia, todas as famílias podem escolher a escola da sua preferência. Seja pública ou privada. (...) em 1992, a Suécia introduziu o cheque ensino porque se debatia com os mesmos problemas na escola pública  ( ...) o dinheiro segue a criança (...) as escolas ou apresentam bons resultados ou perdem os seus alunos (...) e não, não podem escolher os seus alunos (...) cada escola pode desenhar os seus próprios programas e implementar os seus processos de ensino (...) e, estão sujeitas aos exames nacionais e abertas às inspecções governamentais (...)

PS : segue em Inglês


In the capital city of socialist Sweden, as in the rest of the country, schoolchildren and their parents were finalizing their choice of public or private school - using the school-voucher program available to all Swedish children.

 

Sweden introduced school vouchers throughout the country in 1992 to deal with exactly the same quality problems we face in our public schools.

 

Under the program, enacted by a center-right coalition government, children can use a voucher to go to either public schools or one of the growing number of private schools.

 

Private schools include religious schools and even for-profit schools. One of the largest for-profits - Kunskapsskolan (or "Knowledge School") - runs 32 schools with about 10,000 students ages 12-18.

 

These independent schools, like the public schools, get a voucher payment for each child. They compete vigorously with one other because the money follows the child to the school of his or her choice. Schools must satisfy their customers ... or lose them.

 

No, the private schools cannot select the students they want. They can't just cream the smartest and the richest. They have to accept children on a first come, first serve basis. And they cannot charge additional fees, so poor Swedish children have exactly the same shot at the top private schools as rich children.

 

Every private school is free to design its own programs and teaching methods, but each must cover the content of Sweden's national curriculum. Each school also must participate in national testing and be open to government inspection.

 

Before the voucher system was enacted in 1992, the Social Democrats - then the opposition party - opposed it. But when they were swept back to power in 1994, the voucher program was so successful and popular that they did not repeal it. In fact they expanded it, increasing the voucher amount from the original 85 percent of local public school costs to 100 percent.

  

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